community Service means Business!

5 March 2011

jimuleda sent you this page: What The Cello And Bass Were Built For: Von Thord - Wedding Night [VIDEO]

StumbleUpon
View Now >
I found this web page using StumbleUpon and thought you might enjoy it.
keep dancing!
What The Cello And Bass Were Built For: Von Thord - Wedding Night [VIDEO]
dump.com/2011/02/25/what-the-c...
Don't forget to check out my favorite web pages and learn how you can use StumbleUpon to discover great content recommended just for you.

- jimuleda

StumbleUpon is a discovery engine that finds the best of the web, recommended just for you. Learn more

If you do not wish to receive emails sent by StumbleUpon, please click here

© StumbleUpon 2001 - 2011

Posted via email from jimuleda's posterous

jimuleda sent you this page: Rodrigo y Gabriela Diablo Rojo on Vimeo

StumbleUpon
View Now >
I found this web page using StumbleUpon and thought you might enjoy it.
dance, i say!
Rodrigo y Gabriela Diablo Rojo on Vimeo
vimeo.com/1572847
Don't forget to check out my favorite web pages and learn how you can use StumbleUpon to discover great content recommended just for you.

- jimuleda

StumbleUpon is a discovery engine that finds the best of the web, recommended just for you. Learn more

If you do not wish to receive emails sent by StumbleUpon, please click here

© StumbleUpon 2001 - 2011

Posted via email from jimuleda's posterous

1 March 2011

10 Forms of Twisted Thinking

via World of Psychology by Therese J. Borchard on 2/26/11

10 Forms of Twisted ThinkingBoth David Burns (bestselling author of Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy and Abraham Low (founder of Recovery, Inc.) teach techniques to analyze negative thoughts (or identify distorted thinking — what psychologists call “cognitive distortions”) so to be able to disarm and defeat them.

Since Low’s language is a bit out-dated, I list below Burns’ “Ten Forms of Twisted Thinking,” (adapted from his “Feeling Good” book, a classic read) categories of dangerous ruminations, that when identified and brought into your consciousness, lose their power over you.

1. All-or-nothing thinking (a.k.a. my brain and the Vatican’s): You look at things in absolute, black-and-white categories.

2. Overgeneralization (also a favorite): You view a negative event as a never-ending pattern of defeat.

3. Mental filter: You dwell on the negatives and ignore the positives.

4. Discounting the positives: You insist that your accomplishments or positive qualities don’t count (my college diploma was stroke of luck…really, it was).

5. Jumping to conclusions (loves alcoholic families): You conclude things are bad without any definite evidence. These include mind-reading (assuming that people are reacting negatively to you) and fortune-telling (predicting that things will turn out badly).

6. Magnification or minimization: You blow things way out of proportion or you shrink their importance.

7. Emotional reasoning: You reason from how you feel: “I feel like an idiot, so I must be one.”

8. “Should” statements (every other word for me): You criticize yourself or other people with “shoulds,” “shouldn’ts,” “musts,” “oughts,” and “have-tos.”

9. Labeling: Instead of saying, “I made a mistake,” you tell yourself, “I’m a jerk” or “I’m a loser.”

10. Blame: You blame yourself for something you weren’t entirely responsible for, or you blame other people and overlook ways that you contributed to a problem.

You can learn more about the 15 common cognitive distortions (e.g., the most common forms of twisted thinking with more in-depth explanations and examples), as well as how you can fix cognitive distortions once you’ve identified them.

Posted via email from jimuleda's posterous

Life's Too Short...

via little chief honeybee. by kaelah beauregarde on 2/28/11

I remember seeing this brilliant ad campaign a few years ago, but I only recently stumbled upon a full collection of pictures. This is hands down one of the most well planned and executed campaigns that I've ever seen. While the Sherwin Williams paint-swatch campaign will always have a place in my heart, I'm tempted to say few things have beat this one out. The campaign is for the German job site, Jobsintown.de. If I'm not mistaken these ads go all the way back to early 2006, or even before! The point of the ads is pretty transparent, but that's what makes the impact so powerful. I am in awe. Brilliant use of design!


They're even borderline creepy! It's as though you just expect them to start moving!

What are your thoughts? What are some of your favorite or most memorable ad campaigns?

Posted via email from jimuleda's posterous

Talk2Me

be here-Now!

into the Gaping Void

My Friend Flickr

Talk Gone Wrong

Drop-off Box

drop.io: simple private sharing

plan2planet

Blog Archive